Outdoor Living4 min

Do You Need a Building Permit for a Storage Shed?

You’ve long been anticipating the many benefits of having a new storage shed on your property, so it’s exciting when the time finally comes to plan it. Before you proceed, it’s important to contact your local county or city zoning department to determine code requirements you must follow for sheds. Building codes vary by location, and it is the responsibility of a homeowner to obtain any necessary building permits prior to installation of a new shed.

Permit Requirements for Sheds Vary by Location

In most areas, you generally do not need a building permit for a small shed, such as a 6×8 or an 8×10. However, larger storage buildings may challenge local zoning restrictions. Many areas will only allow sheds to be installed in backyards. In addition, some areas mandate that the shed footprint can’t exceed a certain percentage of the lot size. If you install a shed that is in violation of your local building code, you will likely be faced with a penalty and the cost of relocation or removal. Here are some instances when a permit may be required for a shed.
  • Electricity. If you want to wire your shed for electricity, you will probably need a permit.
  • Intended use. If you plan on using your shed to conduct business or as a living space, you will need to let the local zoning department know so the structure can be properly permitted and inspected.
  • Placement. Some local codes mandate how close a shed can be to fences, trees, property lines and other buildings. Some areas do not allow a shed to be attached to a home.
  • Size. You may face size and height restrictions on a shed. You may also be required to use a certain type of shed foundation.
  • Homeowners associations. Your local neighborhood may have its own regulations about outdoor buildings. If you live in an HOA-regulated home, be sure to verify community rules and covenants.

Should You Hire a Shed Professional?

Remember, building and zoning permit requirements will vary from one location to another. Always verify city and county requirements before buying or building a shed. Hiring a professional to help with the permit application process and advise you on shed options can make your project a breeze. Find a shed dealer in your area.  
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Renovation5 min

Tips on Re-Siding in Historic Districts

If you own a home in a historic district, you can forget about replacing the existing siding with vinyl. Most historic districts require replacement siding to closely match the original, hence wood (or engineered wood) and brick. Understanding home building regulations based on historic overlays can help eliminate the headache during renovations, so it’s important to stay in the know before embarking on the project.

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Renovation5 min
Top Four Home Exterior Tips for Fall

With fall just around the corner, it’s time to plan how you will ensure your home’s exterior is ready for the cooler temperatures while also keeping up with the latest seasonal trends. Not sure where to start? We break down the top four home exterior tips for fall for a little inspiration.

Trends6 min
Using the Right Siding for a Ranch Home

Ranch-style home designs are known for low and wide single-story profiles, large picture windows, sliding glass doors and attached front garages. These close-to-the-ground homes were first built in the U.S. in the 1920s, but they didn’t gain widespread popularity until the post-World War II era into the 1970s. As suburbia spread, the ranch-style house became one of America’s favorites. The popularity of ranch-style homes waned in the ‘80s and ‘90s, but it’s making a comeback as younger homebuyers rediscover the ranch’s charm—much like they did with bungalows.

Maintenance4 min
What First-Time Buyers Should Know About Home Maintenance and Storage

Most first-time homebuyers arm themselves with a lot of information about mortgage interest rates and closing costs. What they sometimes overlook are the repair costs prior to moving into previously owned homes and the long-term maintenance costs associated with homeownership.