Curb Appeal9 min

Color Combinations for Unusual Roof Colors

We’ve looked at LP® SmartSide® house siding color sets for brown roofs, as well as gray and black roofs, but what if you have a more unusual roof color? 

House Siding Colors for Green Roofs

In the early to mid-1900s, a green roof was not unusual at all. Dark green roofs were common on house styles including bungalows, four squares and cottages. Although they went out of vogue for several decades, many roof manufacturers have reintroduced the once-common green roof option, only this time in an architectural shingle. A green roof is surprisingly versatile and makes for a charming alternative to a neutral-colored one.

A green roof works well with:

  • Brick colors like red or yellow
  • Trim colors that are whites and off-whites
  • LP lap siding that is white, gray-green, yellow or red
  • Wood-stained siding

House Siding Colors for Red Roofs

Red roofs are often seen in country or farm settings, and are usually a metal standing seam option. Like green asphalt shingles, red asphalt shingles were once a popular choice for early 20th century homes. Terracotta tile roofs are common on southwestern-style homes, usually with a plaster house siding.

A red roof works well with:

  • Cool gray stone
  • Yellow brick
  • LP lap siding that is white, cream, charcoal, yellow or green

Multi-colored roofs are less common, but there are manufacturers that are creating multi-colored shingles that look similar to historic slate. The important thing is to repeat one or two of the colors in the roof somewhere else on the house’s exterior. If there is green in the roof, repeat the green color either the shutters or the front door to make the color scheme cohesive.

Next time, I’ll tell you how to work with stone and brick colors in your overall exterior color scheme.

Note: All photos are for illustrative purposes only. Please refer regularly to lpcorp.com for correct and up-to-date product installation instructions. Get our latest blogs delivered straight to your inbox when you sign up for our Blog Newsletter!    

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Renovation5 min

Tips on Re-Siding in Historic Districts

If you own a home in a historic district, you can forget about replacing the existing siding with vinyl. Most historic districts require replacement siding to closely match the original, hence wood (or engineered wood) and brick. Understanding home building regulations based on historic overlays can help eliminate the headache during renovations, so it’s important to stay in the know before embarking on the project.

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Renovation5 min
Top Four Home Exterior Tips for Fall

With fall just around the corner, it’s time to plan how you will ensure your home’s exterior is ready for the cooler temperatures while also keeping up with the latest seasonal trends. Not sure where to start? We break down the top four home exterior tips for fall for a little inspiration.

Trends6 min
Using the Right Siding for a Ranch Home

Ranch-style home designs are known for low and wide single-story profiles, large picture windows, sliding glass doors and attached front garages. These close-to-the-ground homes were first built in the U.S. in the 1920s, but they didn’t gain widespread popularity until the post-World War II era into the 1970s. As suburbia spread, the ranch-style house became one of America’s favorites. The popularity of ranch-style homes waned in the ‘80s and ‘90s, but it’s making a comeback as younger homebuyers rediscover the ranch’s charm—much like they did with bungalows.

Maintenance4 min
What First-Time Buyers Should Know About Home Maintenance and Storage

Most first-time homebuyers arm themselves with a lot of information about mortgage interest rates and closing costs. What they sometimes overlook are the repair costs prior to moving into previously owned homes and the long-term maintenance costs associated with homeownership.