Renovation6 min

Paint Colors for Doors

While some homeowners prefer a traditional stained wood door, there are benefits to choosing a painted door. Paint-grade wood is significantly less expensive and can be repainted a different color if you ever want a change. If you choose to install a steel or aluminum door, staining isn’t a choice – paint will be your only option.

The most universally attractive front door colors for homebuyers include red, black and variations of blue, but don’t let that keep you from trying an inviting new color to welcome visitors. Here are some of my favorite colors for front doors from our LP® Decorologist® Color Collection.

The color of the front door of the home is like a welcome sign to visitors, so make it inviting. Unlike siding colors, the front door color is not a big commitment and one that can be easily repainted by a homeowner, so it’s one decision that can be more playful or trendy.

Door painted LP Portrait Blue

If you have a covered porch, the door will be shadowed at times and will appear darker and dimmer than it would if it were elsewhere on the home.

A bolder, more saturated color (in comparison to the body, trim, and shutters) will be a better choice than a color that simply fades away in the shadows of your front porch. You may wish to choose a door color that repeats a bit of color found elsewhere on the home. For example, if your architectural roof shingles feature some green highlights, you may choose a rich green to tie it into the roof.

Last year, I had a client who wanted to change her existing red door color because she felt it looked “out of place.” The stone on the body of her house had blue and orange undertones. I suggested two options, both of which were darker, rich versions of the undertones of the stone. Either color would be better choices to pull the color palette together:

If your shutters are a color that significantly contrasts with siding colors, you can simply use that same color on the front door so that the palette doesn’t become too busy.

Door painted LP Garden Gnome

However, if you have a neutral shutter color like black, dark brown, or dark gray, painting out a front door in a strong contrasting color will give you the “wow” factor your home may need.

Door painted LP Copper Pot
You don’t typically want back or side doors to stand out like the front door, so paint those out in the trim color to downplay their prominence. Later, we’ll talk in-depth about shutters and how to use them to bring character and distinction to your exterior.
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Renovation5 min

Tips on Re-Siding in Historic Districts

If you own a home in a historic district, you can forget about replacing the existing siding with vinyl. Most historic districts require replacement siding to closely match the original, hence wood (or engineered wood) and brick. Understanding home building regulations based on historic overlays can help eliminate the headache during renovations, so it’s important to stay in the know before embarking on the project.

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Renovation5 min
Top Four Home Exterior Tips for Fall

With fall just around the corner, it’s time to plan how you will ensure your home’s exterior is ready for the cooler temperatures while also keeping up with the latest seasonal trends. Not sure where to start? We break down the top four home exterior tips for fall for a little inspiration.

Trends6 min
Using the Right Siding for a Ranch Home

Ranch-style home designs are known for low and wide single-story profiles, large picture windows, sliding glass doors and attached front garages. These close-to-the-ground homes were first built in the U.S. in the 1920s, but they didn’t gain widespread popularity until the post-World War II era into the 1970s. As suburbia spread, the ranch-style house became one of America’s favorites. The popularity of ranch-style homes waned in the ‘80s and ‘90s, but it’s making a comeback as younger homebuyers rediscover the ranch’s charm—much like they did with bungalows.

Maintenance4 min
What First-Time Buyers Should Know About Home Maintenance and Storage

Most first-time homebuyers arm themselves with a lot of information about mortgage interest rates and closing costs. What they sometimes overlook are the repair costs prior to moving into previously owned homes and the long-term maintenance costs associated with homeownership.