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Renovation5 min

What’s the Difference Between Composite vs. Engineered Wood Siding?

When deciding to re-side your home, it can be difficult to get a handle on all the terms. It’s exciting once you start researching siding options for appearance and inspiration, but understanding the substrate specifics can be daunting. It’s important to learn the key differences before jumping into a decision.

A good place to start is understanding the difference between composite siding vs. engineered wood siding, as composite siding is one of the most popular options around. Traditionally, composite siding is made up of fibrous wood pieces as a base that is bonded with additional materials. However, there are also composite siding options that do not use wood as the base (for example using cement instead). There are many different composite siding options to choose from, with one of those being engineered wood siding.

Specifically, LP® SmartSide® Trim & Siding is an engineered wood siding that features proprietary technology for protection against hail, wind, moisture, fungal decay and termites. LP SmartSide Trim & Siding is made of Aspen, a light wood that includes minimal extractives or tannins that could stain and bleed through, which helps improve appearance. During the manufacturing process, the product is cut and sliced into strands.

“The strand size is important,” said Matt Vrazel, the Process and Product Development Manager at LP Building Solutions. “If the strand is too small, it compromises strength. If the strand is too large, it creates too many variations in density.” 

LP SmartSide siding is made up of wood strands about the size of a business card that are coated with a moisture-resistant overlay and compressed to create superior strength. It is treated with zinc borate that a) is proven to resist termites and fungal decay, b) manufactured to resist moisture and c) provides extreme durability to stand up to impact. 

If your contractor uses the term “composite siding,” be sure to ask for further clarification. Since you now know that composite siding is a broad category with many options under its vast umbrella, you are well on your way to being a pro when selecting one that you will be happy with for the years to come.

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Trends4 min

Everything You Need to Know About Board & Batten Siding

Board and batten style siding is enjoying a resurgence as a way to create visual interest in an otherwise blank wall. So, what is “board and batten?” It’s a type of siding where thin strips of wood molding—or “battens”—are placed over the seams of panel boards. The result is an aesthetic that is both rustic and chic, with the strong vertical lines providing shadows and textures to the home exterior.

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Renovation5 min
Homeowner’s Guide to Remodeling a Historic Home

The story behind your home offers a fascinating glimpse into the people who lived in it as well as how your home fits into the larger story of your city. If you want to remodel your historic home’s exterior, experts advise visiting your local historic preservation commission. If your home lies within the historic overlay district, these commissions often have authority to set rules not only on the visual aesthetic, but the materials as well.

Trends3 min
Mixing Siding with Different Exterior Textures

Mixing different types of siding can give your home individuality and visual appeal, but it can also be difficult to execute correctly without guidance. While some homeowners mix materials to create a contemporary look, others already have a mixed materials home exterior that needs an update. We’re breaking down practical tips to pair exterior materials for a beautiful home.

Maintenance3 min
When to Replace Old, Decaying Siding

Fungal decaying siding can cause a multitude of problems such as improperly heating and cooling your home and even compromising its structure. Many times, fungal decay is hidden and homeowners may not know how to spot the warning signs. And if they do, it can be difficult to gauge whether it’s time for a siding replacement or repair. But have no fear. We’re offering an in-depth guide on the signs to spot fungal decay and, more importantly, what to do next.