Renovation6 min

FAQs About 5 Home Siding Options

Siding is a major concern during any home exterior remodeling project. Use this guide to learn more about siding materials and the installation process.

1. What Are Your Siding Options?

Understanding what your siding options are will help you evaluate what’s right for your home. Vinyl, brick, fiber cement, stucco, natural and synthetic stone, and engineered wood siding are popular materials.

2. How Much Will Your Siding Cost?

The total cost of re-siding will vary based on your home’s size and design and where you live. Here are some price ranges that will help you better estimate the cost of siding.

  • Vinyl siding costs about $2.00 to $7.00 per square foot.
  • Brick siding costs between $6.00 and $15.00 per square foot.
  • Fiber cement siding has an average cost of around $6.00 to $12.00 per square foot.
  • Stucco siding typically costs between $6.00 and $9.00 per square foot.
  • Engineered wood typically costs between $3.00 and $5.00 per square foot.

lp smartside siding texture

3. How Long Will Your Installation Take?

Many siding jobs will take approximately two weeks. Most homeowners can stay in their homes during the siding installation process, though there may be a good deal of noise during the day. Large or oddly shaped homes, on average, can take longer to complete. You should consult with the siding professional you hire to get an exact estimate and plan accordingly.

4. How Long Will Your Siding Last?

Your siding’s lifespan is highly dependent on how well it is maintained, where you live and what kind of exposures the siding will face. Warranties are one measure of how long siding is expected to last:

  • Vinyl siding warranties are often for the life of the home.
  • Brick siding is typically not warranted but should last the lifetime of the home if maintained correctly.
  • Fiber cement siding is typically warranted for 30 years or more if installed by certified installers.
  • Stucco siding is typically not warranted beyond 15 years
  • Engineered wood siding is typically warranted for up to 50 years.

5. When Should You Install New Siding?

Always ask a siding professional about the best time for a siding update. Excessive heat, moisture and cold can delay your project and contribute to structural problems. A pro will be able to provide a time of year that will work best for your home. If possible, find alternatives to replacement for as long as possible with proper maintenance, like cleaning the siding and checking for cracks, holes and minor repairs.

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Renovation5 min

Tips on Re-Siding in Historic Districts

If you own a home in a historic district, you can forget about replacing the existing siding with vinyl. Most historic districts require replacement siding to closely match the original, hence wood (or engineered wood) and brick. Understanding home building regulations based on historic overlays can help eliminate the headache during renovations, so it’s important to stay in the know before embarking on the project.

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Renovation5 min
Top Four Home Exterior Tips for Fall

With fall just around the corner, it’s time to plan how you will ensure your home’s exterior is ready for the cooler temperatures while also keeping up with the latest seasonal trends. Not sure where to start? We break down the top four home exterior tips for fall for a little inspiration.

Trends6 min
Using the Right Siding for a Ranch Home

Ranch-style home designs are known for low and wide single-story profiles, large picture windows, sliding glass doors and attached front garages. These close-to-the-ground homes were first built in the U.S. in the 1920s, but they didn’t gain widespread popularity until the post-World War II era into the 1970s. As suburbia spread, the ranch-style house became one of America’s favorites. The popularity of ranch-style homes waned in the ‘80s and ‘90s, but it’s making a comeback as younger homebuyers rediscover the ranch’s charm—much like they did with bungalows.

Maintenance4 min
What First-Time Buyers Should Know About Home Maintenance and Storage

Most first-time homebuyers arm themselves with a lot of information about mortgage interest rates and closing costs. What they sometimes overlook are the repair costs prior to moving into previously owned homes and the long-term maintenance costs associated with homeownership.