Inspiration2 min

2x6 Walls Achieve Multiple Goals

In many climates, codes are forcing residential construction to use 2x6 walls and denser insulation such as mineral wool. At the same time, many homes are zero lot line which require additional fire endurance when 10’ or less from an adjacent home. Couple those factors with the need for a structural wall that can withstand seismic and high wind forces and we have serious demands on a wall.

The Intertek-listed LPB/WPPS 60-01 2x6 exterior load-bearing wall assembly helps meet these demands and achieves three major objectives: fire code compliance, sound reduction and higher R-values than most 2x4 assemblies. According to a recent study by Home Innovation Research Labs, more than 40 percent of all exterior walls in new single-family construction now use 2x6 assemblies—more than a 10 percent increase in the last decade.

This assembly uses LP® FlameBlock® Fire-Rated Sheathing to meet fire codes for zero-lot-line construction where walls are close to the property line. A 2x6 stud creates 5½-inch wall depth to accommodate more insulation. The extra space offers many advantages. Using mineral wool insulation in a 2x6 wall assembly increases the Sound Transmission Class (STC) rating compared to standard fiberglass insulation. This means that less outdoor noise penetrates the wall. Plus the additional mineral wool insulation in 2x6 assemblies can also achieve an R-value of 23 compared to the typical R-15 in 2x4 walls.

Installing 2x6 exterior walls makes a lot of sense in cold-weather regions and urban infill applications. Homeowners get the triple benefit of fire code compliance, greater energy savings and less outdoor noise intruding into the living space.

Find out where you can purchase fire-rated OSB sheathing for 2x6 wall assemblies.

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Business Advice4 min

Choosing Materials: Best Siding for Cold Climates

January and February typically usher in the season’s coldest temperatures, bringing the need to use building materials that can withstand frigid temperatures with them. However, it’s often the freeze/thaw cycle––cold days followed by quick warm-ups––that can cause significant damage to a home’s siding. So, what is the best siding for cold climates to combat this?

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Business Advice4 min
Best House Sheathing for Cold Climates

With temperatures dropping, insulation and protecting new construction against the elements are top of mind. Of course, builders must consider how insulated wall sheathing can help meet code requirements and contribute to the overall performance of the building envelope. However, they must also carefully consider potential moisture problems both during and after the build and the potential impacts of freeze/thaw cycles. With the season of potential hard freezes followed by fast warm-ups upon us, let’s explore methods for choosing the best house sheathing for cold climates.

Business Advice5 min
Building a House During Winter: Cold Weather Construction Safety Tips

With housing demand at an all-time high, builders do not have the ability to halt home construction during the winter months. Builders can work safely year round, even building houses during winter with planning and preparation. Advanced products and installation methods allow work to be performed during wet and very cold temperatures, but builders also need to consider winter safety for construction workers.

Business Advice4 min
Engineered Wood Siding in Multifamily Developments

Engineered wood siding has long been considered a trustworthy exterior product for single-family homes, but it is often overlooked for multifamily and commercial construction. LP® SmartSide® products are versatile enough for a range of builds beyond traditional single-family homes. Take a look at the homes featured in Madison Parade of Homes for siding inspiration and to see how LP SmartSide Trim & Siding might suit your building needs.