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Inspiration5 min

Most Popular Home Styles by Region

From Cape Cods in the Northeast to modern houses overlooking the Pacific, you can often tell where you are in the U.S. by the most popular home styles around you. Have you ever wondered what is the most popular home style in your region? We asked David Klarich, a regional marketing manager with LP, about architectural styles that stand out most to him in each region of the U.S.

The Western Region:

Modern & Ranch

“California is a more mature market, and most homeowners prefer to live closer to the water and remodel their older home to their liking,” says Klarich. He also finds that ranch and modern house styles are prevalent in this area.

The Northwestern Region:

Modern & Tiny Homes

“Homes are built on higher peaks with expansive windows to take in elite views,” says Klarich. He often sees homes are painted in silvers, beiges and light grays. In this area, homeowners tend to be more ecologically conscious and build smaller homes—even tiny home communities—with solar energy, better options and higher-grade finishes both inside and out.

The Rocky Mountain Region:

Modern

The most popular homes are unique with sharper lines and angles and different window configurations. The colors of these homes complement the mountainous terrain in beiges and dark and light browns. 

The Midwest Region:

Craftsman, Bungalow and Rustic

Favoring conservative facades, Craftsman-style and bungalow homes in traditional lap siding in beiges, grays and darker tones are most popular. “In some areas, we’re seeing more creativity, with more shakes and board and batten used,” says Klarich.

Further north, cabin-style rustic homes with wood-grained or wood siding and big windows open to the lake views are most popular.

Ready to update your Craftsman or bungalow-style home? Be sure to check our blog articles for inspiration!

Southeast & Southern Regions:

Southern Plantation, Farmhouse & European Influence

New construction is shaping the upper-Southeast area, with Southern Plantation-style homes featuring big, round columns among the most popular. “In the Southeast, the urban farmhouse style is preferred with the board and batten look on white siding, black trim and black windows,” says Klarich.

Moving south into Florida, the flair and historic practicality inspire front and wraparound porches as key parts of popular home styles. But the South is not all-inclusive, as David explains a nuance. “In Louisiana, architecture is heavily influenced by their French roots. You don’t see homes like that anywhere else.” 

MidAtlantic and Coastal Regions:

Colonial & Cape Cod

Colonial and Cape Cod in pastels and lighter tones are most popular. “Turrets in light colors and wood cedar shakes are gaining popularity,” says Klarich. Into the Carolinas, Low Country Styles elevated for protection are prevalent.  

Are you impacted by coastal storms? This article explores key factors for working with products that combine beauty with long-lasting durability. 

Northeast Region:

Colonial

“Because of the age of the area, traditional Colonial-style homes in classic whites and cool colors are most popular,” says Klarich. “There is not a lot of room for new construction. Homeowners tend to remodel, staying with the similar look and feel the house has had over the past 100 years.” For remodeling ideas for traditional Colonial homes, check out our recent article

Ready to remodel your home? Be sure to check out our article, A Homeowner’s Perspective: How to Navigate the Renovation Planning Process.

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