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Trends5 min

Using the Right Siding for a Modern Farmhouse

Background of the Modern Farmhouse

European settlers built the first farmhouses in America, modeled after the ones they left behind. The style quickly became an American icon, with its white clapboard siding and covered porches. 

In recent years, designers have offered new visions of this classic style and have dubbed it the “modern farmhouse.” Chip and Joanna Gaines from the home improvement show Fixer Upper were relentless promoters of the modern farmhouse aesthetic, which helped make it chic and add “shiplap” to more people’s vocabulary. Last year, Builder magazine named the modern farmhouse one of the top 5 trends in floor plans. While craftsman homes still account for about 25 percent of all house plans, the modern farmhouse is rapidly gaining ground and now has about 15 percent market share.

Modern Farmhouse Style

Siding and trim play a crucial role in achieving the simplicity and clean lines that are the hallmark of modern farmhouse design. The most popular pairing continues to be white siding with dark trim, although some designers are now using soft pastel siding with red or brown trim.

“A gable with board and batten really says ‘modern farmhouse,’” says Rick Overby, president of Stella Color + Design in Denver. Vertical board and batten siding was indeed one of the products used by Highland Builders’ Dustin McLoud in his modern farmhouse build that captured one of this year’s awards in the “Show Us Your LP® SmartSide®” contest. McLoud also used LP® SmartSide® cedar texture shake siding, soffit, and trim & fascia.

McLoud chose LP siding products because they’re durable and have the versatility to achieve the shiplap aesthetic he was seeking. “With engineered wood products, we now have an option that offers a traditional wood appearance that’s built to last,” he says.

Get the Modern Farmhouse Style with Smooth Siding

LP SmartSide smooth siding is versatile, able to seamlessly transition from modern to historical to traditional styles. Smooth siding is a great option for the modern farmhouse look because it:

  • Offers eye-catching juxtaposition to natural exterior materials
  • Mixes light, clean lines of smooth siding with darker, textured materials (like wooden beams) to create instant vintage charm.
  • Is sleek siding that strikes the perfect balance between classic and contemporary styles.

Find more inspiration using smooth siding on this infographic describing cape cods and updated ranch homes.

Find Your Inspiration

If you’re wanting to freshen up your modern farmhouse exterior, here are some ideas to inspire you.

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