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What Are the Best Nails to Use for Engineered Wood Siding?

When you’re installing lap siding, choosing the right LP® SmartSide® installation tools will help lead to a faster, easier process, and you’ll likely avoid common siding installation mistakes along the way. Once you’ve chosen engineered wood as a substrate, match it with the right type of nails to use for siding made from wood strands.

 Nails for lap siding, such as LP SmartSide Trim & Siding, should be 0.113-inch smooth shank diameter hot-dip galvanized nails. A minimum 0.092-inch smooth shank diameter nail may be substituted depending on wind pressure, wind speed and wind exposure category limitations in APA Product Report PR-N124 or ICC-ES Report ESR-1301.

Hot-dip nails are among the best nails for wood siding because they are treated with zinc to resist rust formation. The aforementioned sizes of lap siding nails represent good basic options for most siding applications.

How Long Should Nails Be for Siding?

Ideal siding nail length involves how far a nail should go into the build’s structural framing. For LP SmartSide engineered wood products, LP recommends that the nail be long enough to penetrate structural framing or wood structural panels and wood structural framing by at least 1-1/2 inches. In addition, see APA Product Report PR-N124 for a sheathing-only attachment option.

When nailing in siding, be sure to set the nail gun so the head of the nail is flush with the siding surface and try to avoid overdriving nails.

Can You Use Brad Nails for Siding?

Brad nails should not be used as nails for lap siding. Because they are thinner than standard nails and have a smaller head, they are generally not intended for applications with thicker material where a strong hold is required. They are also generally not galvanized. The best type of nails to use for siding include hot-dip galvanized nails, which boast strength and durability to complete your siding installation successfully.

Can I Use Roofing Nails for Siding?

When it comes to the type of nails to use for siding, it’s best to stick with siding nails. Roofing nails, while they may be galvanized, are generally shorter in length and will not allow for the required 1-1/2 inch penetration into structural framing or wood structural panels and wood structural framing. Stick to nails designed for installing lap siding for best results.

Learn Nailing Tips From the Experts at LP

For LP SmartSide Trim & Siding, we recommend a  0.113-inch shank diameter hot-dip galvanized nail for installing lap siding. 0.092-inch nails can also be used depending on the wind pressure, speed and exposure category limitations (see APA Product Report PR-N123 or ICC-ES Evaluation Report ESR-1301). Using these nails will help you avoid many siding installation mistakes. There are also many approved alternative fastening options outlined in the application instructions that can lead to great results.

Check out our trim and siding product page to explore our variety of timeless, durable LP SmartSide offerings, as well as the limited LP SmartSide warranty.

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