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Maintenance6 min

Cold-Weather Checklist: 8 Ways to Winterize Your Home

Oh, the weather outside is frightful…

Before the temperatures drop down near or below freezing, you will want to take certain precautions to prepare your home for winter weather. This will help you avoid costly repairs, uncomfortable conditions inside the house and extravagant utility bills.  

Here is a list of eight ways to house prep for winter:

  • Pipes
    • Check the insulation around your pipes, particularly in unconditioned spaces.
    • When temperatures dip below freezing, open cabinets underneath sinks and let faucets drip slowly. The water moving through the pipes will help prevent freezing within your plumbing.
  • Snow Removal
    • If you don’t have one, purchase a snow shovel before the first winter weather is forecasted. You’ll want to be ready when it hits rather than stuck inside the house. Also pick up a deicing agent, but always check with a professional before applying to driveway and sidewalk to be sure you won’t do any damage.
    • If you have a snowblower, do a maintenance check either yourself or with a professional.
  • Windows
    • Stop drafty windows in their tracks by applying weather-stripping or caulking.
    • Closing heavy shades or blinds will help keep warm air in by adding a layer of insulation, as well.
  • Doors
    • Inspect and/or install storm doors on exterior entries.
    • Use weather-stripping and door sweeps to prevent drafts.
  • Fireplaces & Stoves
    • Make sure they are clean of debris and soot.
    • Have a professional clear out any nests that animals may have built in the chimney over the warmer months.
  • Heating System
    • Change your filters, close any exterior vents that may have been opened during the warmer months and install a programmable thermostat.
    • Test your system and have any maintenance done before the chilly weather arrives so you reduce your chances of interruptions during the winter.
  • Gutters & Downspouts
    • As autumn leaves may have collected in your gutters and downspouts, be sure to clear them out before winter.
  • Exterior Siding
    • Check your siding for any cracks. Freeze/thaw patterns in the winter can be problematic to some siding materials, where water seeping into cracks expands upon freezing and causes more breakage.
    • Invest in a reside before the winter season sets in so you can reduce your chances of damage from freezing temperatures. An engineered wood siding like LP® SmartSide® Trim & Siding is designed to resist freeze/thaw patterns and offer a layer of protection against breakage from winter temperatures.

Want more advice? Check out this blog on “Five Last-Minute Shed Winterizing Tips.”

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