Maintenance5 min

The Powerful Force That Damages Siding in Winter & What You Can Do About It

Most siding materials perform well in optimal conditions, but the true test comes when strong winds blow and temperatures fluctuate above and below freezing. This subtle force of nature, known as the freeze-thaw cycle, can be as damaging to siding as sun, wind and hail.

What Is the Freeze-Thaw Cycle?

The freeze-thaw cycle is a powerful weathering agent. For example, if water seeps into a small crack in a rock and freezes overnight, the water will expand nearly 10%. The expansion makes the crack larger, making room for more water. The next time the temperature falls below freezing, water freezes and the crack expands further. This cycle continues until, over time, large rocks are broken into small fragments.

This same powerful cycle can affect siding materials that absorb water, such as fiber cement. Water penetrates the siding and remains in the substrate. When it freezes, the water expands and creates extreme pressure within the material. As the freeze-thaw cycle happens over and over, year after year, the cumulative effect can eventually cause cracking and serious structural damage to siding material.

LP® SmartSide® Trim & Siding Resists Water Infiltration

Engineered wood siding from LP is a great solution for contractors who are building in cold climates. LP® SmartSide® Trim & Siding are wood-based products that resist cracking, warping and splitting. These products are manufactured from an innovative combination of wood fibers or strands, water-resistant resins and industrial-grade binders. The result is a material that resists water infiltration and can withstand high humidity, extreme temperatures, fungal decay and termites.

A Reliable Option for Cold-Weather Siding Installation

Just as not all siding can stand up to freeze-thaw cycles, not all siding can be installed when it’s cold outside. Siding installed in very cold weather will expand slightly when temperatures rise, which often causes issues with joints and corners, and around windows. Vinyl siding in particular becomes brittle and is prone to cracking when installed in cold temperatures. Thanks to their advanced durability and stability, LP SmartSide siding products can be installed in low temperatures without fear of cracking or extreme expansion.

Start Using LP SmartSide Products

If you are a siding contractor, we’re confident you will love the outstanding workability of our LP SmartSide products, and your customers will love the exceptional durability and beautiful curb appeal. To learn more or to purchase LP products, find dealers near you.

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Renovation5 min

Tips on Re-Siding in Historic Districts

If you own a home in a historic district, you can forget about replacing the existing siding with vinyl. Most historic districts require replacement siding to closely match the original, hence wood (or engineered wood) and brick. Understanding home building regulations based on historic overlays can help eliminate the headache during renovations, so it’s important to stay in the know before embarking on the project.

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Renovation5 min
Top Four Home Exterior Tips for Fall

With fall just around the corner, it’s time to plan how you will ensure your home’s exterior is ready for the cooler temperatures while also keeping up with the latest seasonal trends. Not sure where to start? We break down the top four home exterior tips for fall for a little inspiration.

Trends6 min
Using the Right Siding for a Ranch Home

Ranch-style home designs are known for low and wide single-story profiles, large picture windows, sliding glass doors and attached front garages. These close-to-the-ground homes were first built in the U.S. in the 1920s, but they didn’t gain widespread popularity until the post-World War II era into the 1970s. As suburbia spread, the ranch-style house became one of America’s favorites. The popularity of ranch-style homes waned in the ‘80s and ‘90s, but it’s making a comeback as younger homebuyers rediscover the ranch’s charm—much like they did with bungalows.

Maintenance4 min
What First-Time Buyers Should Know About Home Maintenance and Storage

Most first-time homebuyers arm themselves with a lot of information about mortgage interest rates and closing costs. What they sometimes overlook are the repair costs prior to moving into previously owned homes and the long-term maintenance costs associated with homeownership.