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Renovation5 min

Tips on Re-Siding in Historic Districts

If you own a home in a historic district, you can forget about replacing the existing siding with vinyl. Most historic districts require replacement siding to closely match the original, hence wood (or engineered wood) and brick. Understanding home building regulations based on historic overlays can help eliminate the headache during renovations, so it’s important to stay in the know before embarking on the project.

If your home is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, you’re required to use the same exterior material found on the original, e.g. logs to refurbish a historic log cabin. But most historic homes in the U.S. aren’t in the National Register. They’re governed by local historic societies, which have their own regulations for siding replacement. The first step is to speak with people at your local society—and in most cases, engineered wood is deemed a suitable replacement for the original wood siding.

“Our new LP® SmartSide® Smooth Siding has given us access to the historic areas in New Orleans, as their historic officials require a smooth siding product which our earlier wood-grain siding did not provide,” says Kip Faulk, LP channel manager for the Louisiana area. “We are now working with Saint Bernard Parish-USA, which was created after Hurricane Katrina to remediate damaged homes, some of which are in historic districts. We are currently siding our first project with them in the Lower 9th Ward.” 

It’s important to work with remodelers who know how to renovate in your area in this specialty. For example, the Renovative Building Group in Nashville recently re-sided a home in a historic district with LP SmartSide Smooth Siding. The goal was to preserve the charm of the nearly century old bungalow-style home. “I love the texture and versatility of LP SmartSide Smooth Siding,” says Bobby Bastin, Renovative Building Group president. “In this case, we used the product over the entire exterior to preserve its historical roots.”

Using engineered wood siding in historic districts achieves two important goals—preserving the distinctive look of the original siding and ensuring that it has the durability to withstand the passage of time—to keep its historical charm intact for years to come.

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Trends4 min

Everything You Need to Know About Board & Batten Siding

Board and batten style siding is enjoying a resurgence as a way to create visual interest in an otherwise blank wall. So, what is “board and batten?” It’s a type of siding where thin strips of wood molding—or “battens”—are placed over the seams of panel boards. The result is an aesthetic that is both rustic and chic, with the strong vertical lines providing shadows and textures to the home exterior.

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Renovation5 min
Homeowner’s Guide to Remodeling a Historic Home

The story behind your home offers a fascinating glimpse into the people who lived in it as well as how your home fits into the larger story of your city. If you want to remodel your historic home’s exterior, experts advise visiting your local historic preservation commission. If your home lies within the historic overlay district, these commissions often have authority to set rules not only on the visual aesthetic, but the materials as well.

Trends3 min
Mixing Siding with Different Exterior Textures

Mixing different types of siding can give your home individuality and visual appeal, but it can also be difficult to execute correctly without guidance. While some homeowners mix materials to create a contemporary look, others already have a mixed materials home exterior that needs an update. We’re breaking down practical tips to pair exterior materials for a beautiful home.

Maintenance3 min
When to Replace Old, Decaying Siding

Fungal decaying siding can cause a multitude of problems such as improperly heating and cooling your home and even compromising its structure. Many times, fungal decay is hidden and homeowners may not know how to spot the warning signs. And if they do, it can be difficult to gauge whether it’s time for a siding replacement or repair. But have no fear. We’re offering an in-depth guide on the signs to spot fungal decay and, more importantly, what to do next.