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Outdoor Living8 min

5 Surprising Things You Can Recycle

Old newspapers, plastic bottles, aluminum cans … most of us know these materials can be recycled. What you probably didn’t know is that thanks to technology, there are many other items that can be given new life through recycling. LP, one of the leading manufacturers of shed products, offers the following list of surprising things you can recycle.

Old Motor Oil

If you’re a DIYer, don’t throw old motor oil in the trash after completing your next oil change. Instead, use a funnel to fill a clean, leakproof plastic or metal container and take it to an oil change facility that accepts oil containers, or to a household waste recycling facility near you. The used oil can be fully recycled into heating oil and other petroleum-based products.

CDs and Gaming Discs

Don’t throw those old CDs and cases in the trash. They contain a number of recyclable materials, including polycarbonate plastic, aluminum, lacquer and gold. These materials can be recycled into parts for the automotive and building materials industries. Recycling discs saves virgin material and conserves the resources required to produce them.

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CFL Light Bulbs

CFL bulbs contain mercury. Improper disposal of mercury may lead to contamination of rivers, lakes and drinking water. Burnt-out CFLs can be shipped to a bulb recycler that uses special machines to extract the mercury and recycle the aluminum fixtures and glass casing. CFL bulbs are accepted at all Home DepotIKEA and Lowe’s stores in the U.S., or at your local household hazardous waste event.

Dead Batteries

Nearly all kinds of batteries can be recycled, from car batteries to the AA’s you use in your TV remote. Car batteries contain heavy metals like lead and mercury that can easily contaminate drinking water if left to deteriorate in a landfill. Auto parts stores accept old car batteries for recycling. Technology has advanced to the point that single-use batteries – which contain manganese, zinc and steel – can also be recycled in a cost-effective manner. Many mail-in and take back programs are available.

Denim

Don’t throw worn, outdated jeans in the trash! The Blue Jeans Go Green Denim Recycling Program keeps this waste out of landfills by partnering with clothing retailers to collect the material. The denim is recycled into cotton fiber insulation, which is then donated to Habitat for Humanity and civic building projects.

Find Recycling Resources in Your Area

Visit Earth911 to learn about more surprising items that can be recycled and where to find recycling locations in your area. To learn more about LP Outdoor Building Solutions and the innovative products we produce for backyard sheds, visit www.LPShed.com.
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