Curb Appeal7 min

Choosing Outdoor Elements Based on Your Home’s Exterior

Enhancing your home’s exterior with well-chosen outdoor elements is an easy way to boost curb appeal. Whether you have a ranch or a Victorian, here are some tips to give your home a whole new look.

Choosing Hardscape Materials

The two or three materials used to construct patios, walkways, walls and other elements of a hardscape should not just coordinate with each other, but also with any stone or brick accents on the exterior of a home. Look at the primary colors in the exterior brick or stone, and make sure the colors in the hardscape materials complement these colors.

Choosing Outdoor Lighting

Well-placed landscape lighting adds emphasis to the most beautiful features of your home and gives a pleasant glow to any property. Is your home’s architecture elegant and stately? Clean and contemporary? Craftsman? Mediterranean? There are outdoor lights to suit almost any architectural style. Take cues from your home’s architecture in selecting fixtures that match its style.

Choosing Outdoor Furniture

Outdoor furniture that doesn’t fit with your home’s façade is anything but relaxing. If you have an exterior that is darker in color, select outdoor furniture in a lighter color. If your siding is a shade of white or another neutral, consider a darker furniture finish. Homes accented in contemporary stone veneers look great paired with sleek and modern furniture styles. You can’t get any more traditional than lap siding, which looks great paired with iconic rocking chairs.

outdoor furniture options based on your home exterior

Choosing Landscaping

Determine if your site is best suited to a formal or informal landscape. Formal landscaping includes strong lines with uniform plants and symmetrical plantings. Informal designs are more free-flowing, with asymmetrical elements and plants that are less structured. In addition, think about what trees and shrubs will look like when they reach maturity. Don’t plant anything that could block the view of your home from the street.

Create a Custom Look

Thanks to its broad product line, LP® SmartSide® Trim & Siding products offer the versatility to achieve stunning exteriors with ease, whether you want a classic aesthetic or a modern look. All LP products are manufactured with the proprietary SmartGuard® process to enhance strength and offer exceptional protection against termites and fungal decay. That’s the beauty of working with treated engineered wood trim and siding.

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Renovation5 min

Tips on Re-Siding in Historic Districts

If you own a home in a historic district, you can forget about replacing the existing siding with vinyl. Most historic districts require replacement siding to closely match the original, hence wood (or engineered wood) and brick. Understanding home building regulations based on historic overlays can help eliminate the headache during renovations, so it’s important to stay in the know before embarking on the project.

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Renovation5 min
Top Four Home Exterior Tips for Fall

With fall just around the corner, it’s time to plan how you will ensure your home’s exterior is ready for the cooler temperatures while also keeping up with the latest seasonal trends. Not sure where to start? We break down the top four home exterior tips for fall for a little inspiration.

Trends6 min
Using the Right Siding for a Ranch Home

Ranch-style home designs are known for low and wide single-story profiles, large picture windows, sliding glass doors and attached front garages. These close-to-the-ground homes were first built in the U.S. in the 1920s, but they didn’t gain widespread popularity until the post-World War II era into the 1970s. As suburbia spread, the ranch-style house became one of America’s favorites. The popularity of ranch-style homes waned in the ‘80s and ‘90s, but it’s making a comeback as younger homebuyers rediscover the ranch’s charm—much like they did with bungalows.

Maintenance4 min
What First-Time Buyers Should Know About Home Maintenance and Storage

Most first-time homebuyers arm themselves with a lot of information about mortgage interest rates and closing costs. What they sometimes overlook are the repair costs prior to moving into previously owned homes and the long-term maintenance costs associated with homeownership.