Business Advice5 min

High-Performance Roofs and Attics Require Exceptional Teamwork

They say that “the future arrives first” in California—and its Title 24 codes are indeed propelling America toward a Zero Net Energy future. Designing and building high-performance roofs and attics will take unprecedented teamwork between architects, specifiers, contractors and HVAC professionals.

Here are some of the issues that they’ll jointly be focusing on: 

Energy efficiency – To drive Home Energy Rating System (HERS) scores lower each year, there’s an increased emphasis on installing radiant barrier sheathing to keep solar heat in the roof panel from penetrating into a home’s attic. Products like LP® TechShield® Radiant Barrier Sheathing block up to 97% of the incoming heat, reducing attic temperature by up to 30° F. In addition, more builders are now placing ducts and HVAC equipment inside the home’s conditioned space as a strategy for achieving Zero Net Energy goals.

Proven warranties – Roofing professionals are looking for strong, long-term warranties, like the 20-year transferable limited warranty offered on LP® TechShield® Radiant Barrier.

Easy workability – Builders prefer roofing and attic products that install easily, with no additional tools or specialty labor required. 

Moisture control – Moisture can damage a home’s building envelope so more specifiers are choosing products like LP TechShield sheathing, which features patented technology that allows the panel to dry more quickly during construction and allows for moisture evaporation. 

Roofs are one of the largest parts of a home’s building envelope, yet they often get less attention than windows and walls. That’s why we’re seeing closer collaboration between architects, roofing specifiers, builders and HVAC specialists. Designing high-performance roofs and attics will play an essential role in meeting tomorrow’s rigorous energy codes.

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News & Stories5 min

‘Tis the Season: LP Gives “Shed” an All-New Meaning

In recent years, sheds have become popular for uses beyond practical storage solutions, like a place to put holiday decorations during the off-season. You may know them as she sheds, man caves, hobby sheds, home offices and even backyard bars. Whatever your customers’ needs, sheds offer multifunctional versatility that can help bring them to life in unique ways.

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Business Advice7 min
What to Do When You Uncover Asbestos

Most re-siding projects are on older homes, so it’s a good bet you’ve seen your share of asbestos siding if you operate in the business of siding renovations. Asbestos is a silicate mineral that was commonly added to cement board siding for durability and resistance to fire and weather during the 1920s to 1980s.

Industry Trends6 min
Choosing Durable Building Materials for Distinct Coastal Design

As an architect, putting your stamp of approval on building materials that stand the test of time is one of your top priorities. Multifamily builds when located on the coast, bring their own challenges from the start. With coastal weather conditions, you have unique durability challenges to consider. Coastal weather conditions include increased moisture, heat, humidity, and inclement weather—and your building materials must withstand them all. SAGA Construction, Inc., located on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, is no stranger to the coast’s weather. When they embarked on a recent multifamily project, Cambridge Cove, SAGA executed a design with building materials that would appeal across demographics (homeowners and vacationers alike) while emphasizing durability. Let’s see how they did it.

Business Advice6 min
How to Sell Value in Construction

On custom homes, builders and developers sometimes avoid value-added building materials for a variety of reasons. They might veto those products if the upfront cost is more expensive than standard materials, when in fact the value-added solutions can often lower the long-term cost of ownership for the buyers. In addition, they might fear that crews aren’t as familiar with the value-added materials, which could add to construction time or impact proper installation.