Business Advice5 min

High-Performance Roofs and Attics Require Exceptional Teamwork

They say that “the future arrives first” in California—and its Title 24 codes are indeed propelling America toward a Zero Net Energy future. Designing and building high-performance roofs and attics will take unprecedented teamwork between architects, specifiers, contractors and HVAC professionals.

Here are some of the issues that they’ll jointly be focusing on: 

Energy efficiency – To drive Home Energy Rating System (HERS) scores lower each year, there’s an increased emphasis on installing radiant barrier sheathing to keep solar heat in the roof panel from penetrating into a home’s attic. Products like LP® TechShield® Radiant Barrier Sheathing block up to 97% of the incoming heat, reducing attic temperature by up to 30° F. In addition, more builders are now placing ducts and HVAC equipment inside the home’s conditioned space as a strategy for achieving Zero Net Energy goals.

Proven warranties – Roofing professionals are looking for strong, long-term warranties, like the 20-year transferable limited warranty offered on LP® TechShield® Radiant Barrier.

Easy workability – Builders prefer roofing and attic products that install easily, with no additional tools or specialty labor required. 

Moisture control – Moisture can damage a home’s building envelope so more specifiers are choosing products like LP TechShield sheathing, which features patented technology that allows the panel to dry more quickly during construction and allows for moisture evaporation. 

Roofs are one of the largest parts of a home’s building envelope, yet they often get less attention than windows and walls. That’s why we’re seeing closer collaboration between architects, roofing specifiers, builders and HVAC specialists. Designing high-performance roofs and attics will play an essential role in meeting tomorrow’s rigorous energy codes.

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Industry Trends6 min

Where the Construction Labor Shortage Is Most Severe

According to the latest American Community Survey from the U.S. Census Bureau, about 4 million people now work in residential construction (both single-family and multifamily) – down from the 5 million who were employed just before the Great Recession. Although the workforce has shrunk by 20 percent nationwide, some parts of the country are experiencing less pain than others. Similarly, light commercial construction has been reportedly back on the rise post-Recession, with IBISWorld reporting that the recovery started just before 2014 and continuing steadily through 2019 (source).

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Industry Trends7 min
A Commitment to Product Availability

It’s frustrating when factors outside of your control cause you delays or unexpected expenses during a project. Those factors could be weather delays, insufficient staffing, breakdowns in cash flow and unreliable product availability. LP devotes significant resources each year to ensure that its product availability is second to none. Because even the most innovative building solution is useless to customers unless they know that it’s available when they really need it.

Business Advice10 min
How to Prevent Lap Siding from Buckling by Using a Butt Joint

It’s a silly name, but a “butt joint” is an application technique where two pieces of material are “butted” up against each other. It is the simplest joint to make, and a butt joint can be either end to end or end to face. Depending on the width of the wall, butt joints will occur where two pieces of lap siding come together, creating a vertical seam. LP® SmartSide® lap siding products are available in 16’ lengths, and can help reduce the amount of seams where a butt joint would normally occur when using shorter pieces.

Industry Trends7 min
Why You Should Rely On Data Rather Than Instinct

For many years, construction pros have relied on experience and gut instinct more than on data, but that’s rapidly changing. Many banks, investment groups and insurance companies now need a construction data analysis to help identify potential risks before okaying a construction deal. And in the field, builders need easy access to actionable information – both at the lot level and company-wide – to help boost quality, control costs and manage trade partners.