Industry Trends5 min

How LP Finds Research Talent

Materials like plywood and gypsum haven’t changed much in decades, but engineered wood is continuously evolving. While LP is more easily able to connect with university students studying design, finding tomorrow’s innovators can be challenging because there’s a limited number of college graduates with experience in wood-based composite research.

“In a good economy like we currently have, it’s hard to find highly skilled people in any field, not just the engineered wood industry,” says Kevin Line, LPs Innovation Manager for New Product Development. “Fortunately, LP is a member and sponsor of the Wood-Based Composites Center, an NSF Industry/University Cooperative Research Center. There are two universities – Oregon State and Virginia Tech – that are taking the lead in basic research. North Carolina State, Michigan State and Auburn are also making contributions there. In the realm of applied research – where we take the basic research and make products with it – there are two schools in the forefront: The University of Maine and Michigan Tech in Houghton. We have contracts with both schools to do prototyping and testing.”

A recent example of this is the decay testing done by Michigan Tech on the new LP Elements Performance Fencing. LP understood that the market was looking for a fencing material with the look of traditional wood but with the low maintenance and consistent quality that an engineered wood product provides. Line was instrumental in developing the only high performing engineered wood fencing product on the market—marking the latest breakthrough in the fencing industry since the mid-1980s. Through the testing partnership, the LP Elements fencing product has been put through a battery of extreme weather tests from Hawaii to the Florida Keys to see how it stands up against damaging hail and high impact, punishing UV rays and heat, harsh winter conditions, high-velocity hurricane wind zones, extreme rain and humidity and corrosive salt spray.

Similar to LP Elements rigorous testing, LP Legacy® sub-flooring is Tested Extreme® against the elements from Canada to Mexico to show how the strength and stiffness of LP Legacy stands up even in the toughest conditionsincluding sharks.

“The Consortium works well because there are biannual visits to both the university campuses and the industry-partner sites,” adds Line. “Students came to our headquarters in Nashville last fall and we got to know each other better. It makes it easy to follow up when there’s a job opening.”

Line has a keen eye for talent because he has worked in both aerospace and the building solutions field. “Aerospace projects move very slowly, sometimes stretching 10 years or more,” he says. “LP operates at a much faster pace. My first project here was to source, buy, install and commission a new manufacturing line in six months.”

As LP grows, it becomes increasingly important to find versatile employees like Line who don’t mind multi-tasking to work at LP. “This is a fast-paced environment that requires both people skills and research abilities,” he says. “Every week, I interact with Nashville colleagues, customers and many people at the mills. Consortium graduates who come here get to see research turned into successful new products.”

Continue Reading
Industry Trends5 min

Solutions for the Starter Home Shortage

The supply of modestly priced starter homes continues to drop nationwide. A recent report by Realtor.com found that the number of homes priced above $750,000 grew 11 percent last year, while the number of starter homes priced under $200,000 fell by 8 percent.

Continue Reading
News & Stories6 min
The What’s & Why’s of the LP® SmartSide® 5/50 Limited Warranty

Any building professional will tell you that the quality of a building material is only as good as its warranty. This is why LP Building Solutions created an industry-leading limited warranty for our line of LP® SmartSide® siding products. One that aims to ensure peace-of-mind for builders and homeowners.

Business Advice6 min
Why It’s Important To “Respect the Spec”

While it’s perfectly alright for a jazz musician to improvise, that approach doesn’t always work as well in homebuilding. Architects, specifiers, engineers and product reps spend many hours collaboratively choosing the right materials for each job – and an abrupt substitution to save a few dollars can ironically be very costly in terms of callbacks, design underperformance and even code violations. “Ideally, all parties involved – the architect, builder and developer – have reviewed the spec before it’s final and have agreed on all the products being used,” says Karen Alves, LP Brand Marketing Associate. “That’s because finding an ‘equivalent’ for siding or fire-rated sheathing involves not just the substrate but the codes that the product meets as well.”

Business Advice4 min
Siding That’s a Cut Above

Siding installers use many different brands of circular saws, but their preferred saw may not be as important as the siding material they are cutting with it. Some builders can sometimes be a bit removed from the importance placed on saw choice and would probably rely on their subcontractors choice, like Brent Taylor. “I don’t have much of an opinion on that because I use subcontracted labor,” says Brent Taylor, owner of O.C. Taylor in Raleigh, North Carolina, who was featured in an episode of Designing Spaces on Lifetime Network renovating a century-old house using LP® SmartSide® Trim & Siding.