Menu
Maintenance5 min

Turn Your Tax Refund Into Lasting Home Improvement

GoBankRates.com estimates that the average tax refund this year will total about $3,000. In a survey conducted by that organization, 10 percent of respondents said they plan to splurge on a vacation or luxury item when the refund arrives. But 9 percent plan to use that money for a “major purchase.”

Some homeowners may choose to buy a refrigerator or washer and dryer with that windfall. But an even better investment would be a home-improvement project that may add to the home’s resale value. For example, a siding replacement adds $12,119 to a home’s average resale value per Hanley Wood. Building a backyard shed can also boost the value of your home, especially if the prospective buyer has a shed-ready hobby and needs an artist studio or woodworking space.  

“Replacing home siding has consistently ranked as one of the best projects for increasing a home’s value,” says Karen Alves, LP’s Brand Segment Marketing Associate for siding. “When you sell the home, you recoup more of your investment than with comparably priced renovations like window replacement.” 

With potentially $3,000 in hand, a homeowner can go beyond a just-the-basics renovation to one that adds significant home value. Here are some idea-starters for how to use a tax refund for a home renovation: 

  • In the Northeast and West regions of the U.S., smooth home exteriors are growing in popularity. The same is true in cities with large historic districts, like Charleston, South Carolina and Savannah, Georgia. A tax refund can be a good first step toward turning a rustic home exterior into a stylish smooth one that matches the local surroundings. 
  • Use the tax refund to build a backyard shed that becomes your creative getaway – whether it’s a painting studio, a yoga retreat or a songwriting haven. And don’t forget that famous authors like Virginia Woolf and George Bernard Shaw actually had “writing sheds” where they retreated for inspiration.

When your refund check arrives, resist the impulse to buy those tickets to Tahiti or jewelry store bling. Invest that money into some remodeling projects that make your home more creative and increase the asking price when you sell.

Continue Reading
Trends4 min

Everything You Need to Know About Board & Batten Siding

Board and batten style siding is enjoying a resurgence as a way to create visual interest in an otherwise blank wall. So, what is “board and batten?” It’s a type of siding where thin strips of wood molding—or “battens”—are placed over the seams of panel boards. The result is an aesthetic that is both rustic and chic, with the strong vertical lines providing shadows and textures to the home exterior.

Continue Reading
Renovation5 min
Homeowner’s Guide to Remodeling a Historic Home

The story behind your home offers a fascinating glimpse into the people who lived in it as well as how your home fits into the larger story of your city. If you want to remodel your historic home’s exterior, experts advise visiting your local historic preservation commission. If your home lies within the historic overlay district, these commissions often have authority to set rules not only on the visual aesthetic, but the materials as well.

Trends3 min
Mixing Siding with Different Exterior Textures

Mixing different types of siding can give your home individuality and visual appeal, but it can also be difficult to execute correctly without guidance. While some homeowners mix materials to create a contemporary look, others already have a mixed materials home exterior that needs an update. We’re breaking down practical tips to pair exterior materials for a beautiful home.

Maintenance3 min
When to Replace Old, Decaying Siding

Fungal decaying siding can cause a multitude of problems such as improperly heating and cooling your home and even compromising its structure. Many times, fungal decay is hidden and homeowners may not know how to spot the warning signs. And if they do, it can be difficult to gauge whether it’s time for a siding replacement or repair. But have no fear. We’re offering an in-depth guide on the signs to spot fungal decay and, more importantly, what to do next.