News & Stories7 min

[VIDEO] Shed Builder Spotlight: Woodtex

Of the four product lines built by Woodtex, a manufacturer based in Brentwood, TN, storage sheds are its biggest seller. Woodtex has been building sheds since 1983, when Kent Lapp’s father started the company in a small shop. Today, Woodtex has expanded to include four manufacturing plants in four states. Each shed is built in-house and delivered to the customer, either fully assembled or in modules. Woodtex is committed to delivering on its promise, “We build the space you need for the important things in life.”

‘The Customers are Loving It’

Kent Lapp, CEO of Woodtex, says it has been exciting to see the shed industry hit the news in the last few years. “Man caves are coming out, she-sheds are coming out. People are using them for studios and that type of thing,” explains Lapp. He says with the shift in demand, Woodtex has had to think differently about how they build sheds and pay more attention to shed design. Woodtex has had a partnership with LP for a number of years. The company recently switched to using LP® SmartSide® siding exclusively on its sheds. “This was a big decision for us, with all the logistics that go along with four different plants,” explains Lapp. “SmartSide siding is working very well for us. The price is great, the quality is fantastic and the customers are loving it.”

‘A Big Deal’

One of the biggest draws of LP SmartSide siding for Woodtex is the fact that it’s borate-treated for termites, a major selling point for shed owners in the southern United States. Plus, the consistency of engineered wood means Woodtex carpenters don’t have to deal with the knots, voids and other fluctuations that are often found in a plywood product. “That’s a big deal to us,” says Lapp
To connect with Woodtex, find a sales center near you or design your own shed online. Woodtex delivers storage buildings anywhere in the nation. Learn more about products from LP Outdoor Building Solutions® at www.lpcorp.com.
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