Inspiration3 min

Why Knots in Traditional Wood Siding are a Nightmare

Softwood species such as cedar, pine, fir and spruce are frequent choices for homes with traditional exterior wood siding and fencing. There are architects who are wood purists and love the natural appeal of wood even though there are many installation and maintenance issues associated with lap, cedar shake and wood siding panels when they specify these materials. Let’s take a closer look at some of the challenges that installers and homeowners face when using traditional wood siding.

More Material Waste and Increased Labor

Wood siding naturally includes knots, voids, cracks and other irregularities. Natural wood defects require more maintenance and are often graded as lower quality material. This process increases the cost of the wood. Loose knots can wiggle free and come out of the board, leaving behind a gaping hole. Nailing into knots is difficult, and cracks in a board allow water to get inside the wood and promote rot. To avoid these defects, an installer must cull through lumber on the job site, picking and choosing the best pieces of wood. This results in more material waste and increased installation and labor time.

The Knot Bleed Dilemma

In the woods, it’s natural for sap to ooze out of the knots in trees. When it comes to siding, pitch and resin can cause major problems with the appearance of painted wood surfaces. Certain tree species, such as red pine, have more resin that results in excessive oozing at the knot. This is especially problematic when the wood is exposed to higher temperatures.

Many an installer has been frustrated when they paint the surface of real wood siding, only to find that resin bleeds through the knots and turns the paint yellow-brown. With further exposure to weather, the discolored paint can become brittle, crack and peel.

LP® SmartSide® Trim & Siding: The Better Choice

LP SmartSide trim and siding feature beautiful wood grain patterns in authentic natural textures. While there are knots included in the texture, these only replicate the natural grain of wood. Our innovative engineered wood products are free of natural wood defects. Because every inch has been treated with our SmartGuard® process to resist termites and decay, you can be confident LP SmartSide products will remain durable and strong.

There are LP SmartSide products for every home you build. Find an LP SmartSide retailer today, or learn more about the benefits of becoming an LP® BuildSmart Preferred Contractor.

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News & Stories5 min

‘Tis the Season: LP Gives “Shed” an All-New Meaning

In recent years, sheds have become popular for uses beyond practical storage solutions, like a place to put holiday decorations during the off-season. You may know them as she sheds, man caves, hobby sheds, home offices and even backyard bars. Whatever your customers’ needs, sheds offer multifunctional versatility that can help bring them to life in unique ways.

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Business Advice7 min
What to Do When You Uncover Asbestos

Most re-siding projects are on older homes, so it’s a good bet you’ve seen your share of asbestos siding if you operate in the business of siding renovations. Asbestos is a silicate mineral that was commonly added to cement board siding for durability and resistance to fire and weather during the 1920s to 1980s.

Industry Trends6 min
Choosing Durable Building Materials for Distinct Coastal Design

As an architect, putting your stamp of approval on building materials that stand the test of time is one of your top priorities. Multifamily builds when located on the coast, bring their own challenges from the start. With coastal weather conditions, you have unique durability challenges to consider. Coastal weather conditions include increased moisture, heat, humidity, and inclement weather—and your building materials must withstand them all. SAGA Construction, Inc., located on the Outer Banks of North Carolina, is no stranger to the coast’s weather. When they embarked on a recent multifamily project, Cambridge Cove, SAGA executed a design with building materials that would appeal across demographics (homeowners and vacationers alike) while emphasizing durability. Let’s see how they did it.

Business Advice6 min
How to Sell Value in Construction

On custom homes, builders and developers sometimes avoid value-added building materials for a variety of reasons. They might veto those products if the upfront cost is more expensive than standard materials, when in fact the value-added solutions can often lower the long-term cost of ownership for the buyers. In addition, they might fear that crews aren’t as familiar with the value-added materials, which could add to construction time or impact proper installation.